The Independent Review is the acclaimed interdisciplinary journal devoted to the study of political economy and the critical analysis of government policy. The Independent Review is thoroughly researched, peer-reviewed, and based on scholarship of the highest caliber. However, unlike so many other journals, it is also provocative, lucid, and written in an engaging style. Ranging across the fields of economics, political science, law, history, philosophy, and sociology, The Independent Review boldly challenges the politicization and bureaucratization of our world, featuring in-depth examinations of past, present, and future policy issues by some of the world's leading scholars and experts.

Undaunted and uncompromising, this is the journal that is pioneering future debate!

Recent Featured Articles


The Economics of Pope Francis: An Introduction
Robert M. Whaples

As the contributors to this symposium show, Pope Francis’s views about the economy, especially about the poor and the rich, are deeply at odds with those of many economists. Several differences involve matters of economic fact and causation—and therefore in principle can be resolved by appeals for everyone to consider the same body of evidence. Although the clash over conflicting values is a chasm far more difficult to bridge, fruitful dialogue is the goal of this symposium.


Introduction: Symposium on Foreign Intervention
Christopher J. Coyne

What’s the proper role of the state in matters of national security and defense? The Independent Review’s symposium on foreign-policy intervention reveals some of the tensions and open issues associated with libertarian and classical liberal views.


Fleecing the Young
Loren E. Lomasky

Millennials can expect to receive much less for their tax dollars than have earlier generations, especially during their retirement years, largely due to the policy choices made by their elders. The time has come for moral philosophy to devote attention to the topic of intergenerational fairness, just as it has attended to issues of race, class, and gender.


Regime Uncertainty and the Great Recession
Wolf von Laer, Adam Martin

Uncertainty triggered by government policy may have played a large role in the U.S. economy’s slow recovery from the Great Recession. Whether or not it is the leading cause of the sluggishness, regime uncertainty is a powerful idea that adds nuance to the theory of market process.