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Peter Thiel | Developing the Developed World
Entrepreneurship, Liberty, and the Future

Recorded: Tuesday, January 27, 2015

Entrepreneur and Author Peter A. Thiel spoke at a luncheon sponsored by the Independent Institute on January 27, 2015. He shared insights from his new book Zero to One on how to create true innovations in “the world of atoms”—not just “digits and bits”—and how to foster a peaceful, prosperous and freer future marked by globalization in a world of limited resources.

Experts: Peter A. Thiel
Type: Independent Institute Event
Issues: Antitrust, Competition, and Monopoly, Bureaucracy and Government, Business, Civil Liberties/ Human Rights, Corporate Welfare, Culture/ Society, Economic History and Development (U.S.), Economic Policy, Education, Energy, Free Market Economics, Freedom, Government Power, Government Secrecy, Health Care, History (U.S), Labor and Employment, Law Enforcement, Political Ideology and Philosophy, Politics, Privacy, Public Health/ Consumer Protection, Regulation and Deregulation, Science, Technology, Transportation

       
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Private Solutions for Reducing Road Congestion, Fuel Costs, Travel Time, and Waste
Recorded: Thursday, September 28, 2006

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Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 4 | Part 5 | Part 6 | Part 7 | Part 8 | Part 9 | Part 10

“Congestion is not a fact of life,” declared Mr. Mineta, “We need a new approach, and we need it now.” Such an approach is presented in the new Independent Institute book, Street Smart: Competition, Entrepreneurship and the Future of Roads.

Experts: Daniel B. Klein, Gabriel Roth, Alexander T. Tabarrok
Type: Independent Institute Event
Issues: Privatization, Transportation

       
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Drug War Crimes
Recorded: Thursday, May 6, 2004

Each year, the U.S. government spends over $30 billion on the drug war and arrests more than 1.5 million people on drug-related charges. Currently more than 318,000 people are behind bars in the U.S. for drug violations—more than the number of people incarcer-ated for all crimes in the United Kingdom, France, Germany, Italy, and Spain combined. Have current drug laws deterred drug abuse and reduced crime? What are the real costs of this country’s war on drugs? Is there a link between the homicide rate and the amount of resources given to drug prohibition? Please join us as Boston University economist Jeffrey Miron (author of the major new book, Drug War Crimes) and former San Jose police chief, Joseph McNamara, examine these questions and explore real alternatives to America’s “War on Drugs.”

Jeffrey A. Miron

Boston University Professor of Economics and author of the new book, Drug War Crimes: The Consequences of Prohibition. His articles on Drug Policy have appeared in Social Research, Boston Globe and the London Observer. He received his Ph. D. in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Joseph D. McNamara

Research Fellow, Hoover Institution. Former Chief of Police, San Jose, CA and Kansas City, MO. He has published articles in the New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, the Wall Street Journal, the Washington Post, and other publications. He has been a commentator for NPR and has appeared on Meet the Press, Good Morning America, Sixty Minutes, and other programs.

Ethan A. Nadelmann

Founder and Executive Director of the Drug Policy Alliance, the leading organization in the United States promoting alternatives to the War on Drugs. Dr. Nadelmann received his Ph.D. and J.D. from Harvard University and a Masters degree in International Relations from the London School of Economics. His speaking and writings on drug policy have attracted international attention and appeared in Science, American Heritage, National Review, and others.

Experts: Joseph D. McNamara, Jeffrey A. Miron, Ethan A. Nadelmann
Type: Independent Institute Event
Issues: Crime, Criminal Justice/ Prisons, Drugs (Illicit), Government Waste/Pork, Law Enforcement

       
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The Drug War on Trial: Two Judges Speak Out
Recorded: Wednesday, September 5, 2001

Drug abuse is a serious problem, but the "War on Drugs" shows no sign of being won and has come with a heavy price tag. Critics say that its side effects- increased taxes, increased crime and corruption here and abroad, loss of civil liberties, decreased health, prison overcrowding, discrimination against African Americans and other groups, and the diversion of resources away from other problems- are even worse for society than the drugs themselves. Many public officials share this sentiment but fear political reprisals if they speak out. However, Judges James Gray and Vaughn Walker, having witnessed the Drug War up close, believe that the time has come to testify publicly about its ill effects- and to outline bold, new approaches to the drug problem.

Experts: James P. Gray, Vaughn Walker
Type: Independent Institute Event
Issues: Crime, Criminal Justice/ Prisons, Drugs (Illicit), Law Enforcement

       
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Fixing America's Cities: Privatization and Community Empowerment
Recorded: Tuesday, April 6, 1999

Stephen Goldsmith

Mayor, City of Indianapolis, Indiana

Author, "The Twenty-First Century City"

Experts: Stephen Goldsmith
Type: Independent Institute Event
Issues: Land Use, Property Rights, Regulation and Deregulation, Transportation, Urban Issues

       
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Stopping Violent Crime: New Directions for Reduction and Prevention
Recorded: Tuesday, December 3, 1996

Tuesday, December 3, 1996

Co-sponsored by the Independent Institute and Koch Crime Commission
University Theater, Garvey Fine Arts Center
Washburn University, Topeka, KS

Moderator:
Arthur R. Miller, Professor of Law, Harvard University

Participants:
Bruce L. Benson, Professor of Economics, Florida State University; Senior Fellow, The Independent Institute
Erika Holzer, bestselling author of book and major motion picture, Eye for an Eye
Wendy Kaminer, Contributing Editor, The Atlantic Monthly
William I. Koch, Chairman, Koch Crime Commission
Alan J. Lizotte, Director, Hindelang Criminal Justice Research Center, University at Albany
David B. Sentelle, Judge, U. S. Court of Appeals, D.C. Circuit
David J. Theroux, Founder and President, The Independent Institute
Richard L. Thornburgh, former U.S. Attorney General
Hubert Williams, President, Police Foundation
Marvin E. Wolfgang, Director, Sellin Center for Studies in Criminology, University of Pennsylvania
James R. Wyrsch, President, Wyrsch Hobbs Mirakian & Lee, P.C.

Violent crime continues to be a major social and economic problem in the United States and around the world. This important debate, held before an audience of 1,000 at Washburn University, features a panel of experts from diverse backgrounds and perspectives, including criminal justice officials, business and civic leaders, scholars, and best-selling authors.

In a lively and challenging exchange of ideas, the program addresses why the criminal justice system has become increasingly bureaucratized and politicized, ever less responsive and ever more costly. Topics include victim’s rights, crime and incarceration rates, restitution, civil liberties, illicit drugs, guns, racism, policing, privatization, and sentencing.

Co-sponsored by The Independent Institute and Koch Crime Commission, this program was distributed by Central Educational Network and appeared on the Public Broadcasting System.

Experts: Bruce L. Benson, Erika Holzer, Wendy Kaminer, William I. Koch, Alan J. Lizotte, Arthur R. Miller, David B. Sentelle, David J. Theroux, Richard L. Thornburgh, Hubert Williams, Marvin E. Wolfgang, James R. Wyrsch
Type: Independent Institute Event
Issues: Bureaucracy and Government, Civil Liberties/ Human Rights, Constitutional Law, Crime, Criminal Justice/ Prisons, Culture/ Society, Drugs (Illicit), Family, Gun Control, Labor and Employment, Law Enforcement, Political Ideology and Philosophy, Public Health/ Consumer Protection, Race Issues, Urban Issues, Welfare, Women’s Issues

       
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Crime, Punishment, and the Criminal Justice System
Recorded: Sunday, June 26, 1994

Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3

Sunday, 26 June 1994

Co-sponsored by the Independent Institute, Kids Voting Kansas, Koch Crime Commission, and the University of Kansas
Kansas Union
University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas

Moderator:
Arthur R. Miller, Professor of Law, Harvard University

Participants:
Randy E. Barnett, Professor of Law, Boston University
William P. Barr, former Attorney General of the United States
Pasco M. Bowman II, Judge, U. S. Court of Appeals, 7th Circuit
Steven J. Davies, Superintendent of Schools, Kingman Norwich, KS
Williamson M. Evers, Fellow, The Independent Institute and Hoover Institution
Joan M. Finney, Governor of Kansas
Raymond W. Kelly, Former Police Commissioner, New York City
William I. Koch, Chairman, Oxbow Corporation
W. Walter Menninger, President and CEO, Menninger Foundation
Gale A. Norton, Attorney General of Colorado
Eric S. Rosen, State District Court Judge, Shawnee County, KS
Nadine Strossen, National President, American Civil Liberties Union
Bailus M. Tate, President, Board of Police Commissioners, Kansas City, MO

Executive Producer:
William I. Koch, Chairman, Oxbow Corporation

Producer and Director:
David J. Theroux, Founder and President, The Independent Institute

Experts: Randy E. Barnett, Stephen J. Davies, Williamson M. Evers, William I. Koch, Arthur R. Miller, Nadine Strossen
Type: Independent Institute Event
Issues: Bureaucracy and Government, Civil Liberties/ Human Rights, Constitutional Law, Crime, Criminal Justice/ Prisons, Culture/ Society, Drugs (Illicit), Family, Freedom, Government Power, Government Waste/Pork, Gun Control, Labor and Employment, Law Enforcement, Political Ideology and Philosophy, Politics, Privatization, Regulation and Deregulation, Welfare

       
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